One of the reasons why coronavirus outbreaks such as COVID-19 are so devastating is that there is no therapy to treat them, nor is there a preventative solution, such as a vaccine.

Groundbreaking research at Baylor College of Medicine shows us there is a chance to change the way we tackle global viral outbreaks, with powerful weapons that could transform our response to future viral epidemics.

Baylor College of Medicine’s programs include:

Center for Drug Discovery, which is actively examining protein targets related to COVID-19 in order to identify possible inhibitor drugs to combat the disease. Director Martin Matuzuk, M.D., Ph.D. is leading the CDD’s efforts to identify the most promising findings and advance them to clinical trials, with the goal of developing cost-effective, novel drug and treatment options for a wide range of diseases, including COVID-19. 

Under the direction of Joseph Petrosino, Ph.D., investigators in the Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research and the Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology are working with colleagues in the Department of Medicine and the Human Genome Sequencing Center on several initiatives to better understand COVID-19. Their goals include examining the immune response to infection, why certain individuals and age groups are more or less susceptible to severe disease, and how the virus is evolving over time. Their ultimate objective is to identify new diagnostic and therapeutic targets and strategies that will enable us to combat it more effectively.

Vaccine Treatment Evaluation Unit in the department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology is about to begin a phase 2 clinical trial for the Gilead drug, remdesivir, which is being investigated as a treatment for COVID-19. The VTEU, directed by Hana El Sahly, M.D is one of 50 national sites involved in this critical phase 2 study.

National School of Tropical Medicine and its Center for Vaccine Development, led by Peter Hotez, M.D., Ph.D., and Maria Elena Bottazzi, Ph.D., both world-renowned vaccine scientists. Drs. Hotez and Bottazzi and their team have identified key similarities in the genetic structures of SARS and COVID-19. In addition to working on a vaccine candidate for the current COVID-19 virus, a potential SARS vaccine candidate they developed might be a crucial step forward in resolving the current health emergency as well as helping us prepare for future outbreaks.

 

But we need your help to find out.   You can help us take action today.

Research teams at Baylor College of Medicine have already made great strides in developing new vaccines and treatments to protect populations around the globe. With your help, they can do even more to defend people from infectious diseases.


Donate today to support this critical work.

 
 
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